Essays / s /

Copyright, Licenses and Terms of Services

The legal implications, when you upload an image to an internet service.

Imagine that a couple of weeks ago you've uploaded a photo to a social internet service. A nice photo that you are proud of and that you just want to show to your followers as usual. However right now you are browsing an art print shop and you see... your photo as the most popular print and on sale as canvas print for $499. Does this makes you upset? Do you want to call an Lawyer to sue these bastards? Now what, if I tell you that the shop could have done nothing wrong from a legal perspective and that they could be perfectly fine making big money with your work?

I am constantly amazed on the lack of knowledge of the terms of services of a internet service users are using. In case you didn't dare to read the terms of services yet and do not care what happens to your content that you are uploading to a site and in case you do not want to know what to look for in the terms of services and their implications, this article will be too boring for you. Feel free to continue uploading your content to any service as usual. But please do not start complaining like these crybabies that uploaded their images under a common CC license to Flickr without ever reading and understanding a license.

Before I begin let's clarify that I am not a lawyer and no expert in copyright law. Further more there isn't something like an international copyright law. These regulations differ from country to country. The points below are my own understanding of the status quo.

Further more I am referring to Facebook and its terms of service (ToS) as a role model example here. Facebook isn't the only black sheep on the net, but after reading this article you hopefully get some hints on what to look for in the jungle of a site's ToS.

Ready, for some boring stuff? OK, let's go.

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The Story Behind "Too Old to Drive"

This is a tutorial that I wrote for an upcoming tutorials book by 1x.com.


The Picture

Canon EOS 550D with Magic Lantern firmware, Sigma 8-16 mm @ 8 mm, 4 Exposures (1/125s, 1/800s, 1/50s, 1/3200s), f/7.1, ISO 100

Bodie is a ghost town north of Mono Lake in California and unlike many other artificial and touristic ghost towns Bodie remains unchanged in its current state and is allowed to decay through natural forces over time. For sure that is one of the reasons for Bodie’s popularity and a must see, when you tour through California like we did in May 2013.

I am pretty sure that most of you have already seen the one or other picture from body, maybe even of this 1937 Chevrolet coupe. Despite the sheer amount of subjects in Bodie this is one of the most interesting for sure.

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